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KonMari method for the kitchen: tidying up according to Marie Kondo


Order in the house is order in the head? According to Marie Kondo, yes. The book “Magic Cleaning” by the Japanese cleaning expert has long since become an international bestseller. With the help of her KonMari method, any chaos can be tamed – radically but effectively. And a little bit spiritual. The system can also be used in the kitchen. So: up your sleeves and start the new year with a tidy kitchen. The cleared mind follows.

Marie Kondo thinks: A kitchen must be easy to clean. That means: create free areas and remove everything from the field of vision that is not required.

The aim of the KonMari method in the kitchen: to create free space.  (Photo: Adobe Stock / denisismagilov)
The aim of the KonMari method in the kitchen: to create free space. (Photo: Adobe Stock / denisismagilov)

Attention: if you want to subject several rooms to a New Year’s makeover, you should not start with the kitchen, because according to KonMari a kitchen is the supreme discipline of tidying up. It is full of odds and ends that make it easy to lose track of things. In addition, tidying up the rest of the living area collects tidiness aids that can be reused in the kitchen. If you start in the kitchen, you should first buy a basic set of boxes and boxes.

“Magic Cleaning” by Marie Kondo: Categorize content

Marie Kondo works the same way in all rooms when cleaning up. You don’t dedicate yourself to tidying up a certain cupboard or a very specific drawer, but think in terms of content categories. According to Marie Kondo, these are the following areas in the kitchen:

  • Cutlery and crockery (Eating utensils)
  • pots and pans (Cooking utensils)
  • Ingredients and spices (Food)

First you put all things of a certain category together on the table or on the floor. What sounds chaotic at first, brings the necessary therapeutic shock in practice: Seeing how much you own and what is unnecessary or even duplicated should finally arouse the ambition to clean up. Goal: In the end, there should be enough storage space for all kitchen utensils and the work surface should be as free as possible.

KonMari method for the kitchen: let the feeling of happiness be your guide

Step 1: Marie Kondo advises picking up each item individually and then asking yourself the question: “Does it make me happy when I hold this item in my hand?” What makes you happy stays – everything else goes away. Admittedly: a pot will have a harder time making us happy than a beloved piece of clothing. Translated to the kitchen, according to this rule, you should definitely ask yourself whether you actually use things – and enjoy doing so.

What at first seems a bit esoteric is intended to direct our focus on the things that are really necessary. Because what makes us happy, we treat it with respect and enjoy it for a long time.

The rule of happiness: According to KonMari, only what makes us happy can stay.  (Photo: Dominika Roseclay / Pexels)
The rule of happiness: only what makes us happy can stay with the KonMari method. (Photo: Dominika Roseclay / Pexels)

According to Marie Kondo, everything should also be banned from the kitchen that is broken, belongs to an incomplete set, is not used or no longer pleases. “Many people live in an environment full of ‘somehow-I-need-this-things’: Be aware of how many of these ‘somehow-things’ you still have. Would you like to have a ‘somehow life’? Stand firm and only keep what makes you really happy, ”she writes in“ Magic Cleaning ”, her best-selling guide, which has meanwhile been translated into almost 40 languages.

The large crockery set that will eventually be used for a large family celebration does not have to be disposed of immediately – at least it should go to the cellar after KonMari.

Step 2: If you have radically sorted out with the help of the happiness method, you should find a permanent place to store the things you still have.

Marie Kondo thinks that keeping things tidy is easier when everything has its place.  (Photo: Adobe Stock / Tatyana A. - tataks)
Marie Kondo thinks that keeping things tidy is easier when everything has its place. (Photo: Adobe Stock / Tatyana A. – tataks)

KonMari method for the kitchen: folding and stowing correctly

Once all your favorite parts have found their place, it’s time to stow them properly. Marie Kondo has become famous for her special folding technique for clothing, underwear or even tea towels and tablecloths.

Tea towels are folded in parcels and stored “upright”. This provides a better overview and protects the parts from creasing. Store textiles in ascending color: dark parts are at the back, light parts are at the front. Alternatively: dark on the left, light on the right. According to Marie Kondo, drawers should only be 90 percent full. This means there is enough space to put away and put away and the contents still remain as a package.

Dark on the left, light on the right: A color gradient from dark to light ensures the maximum feeling of happiness when opening a drawer.  (Photo: Adobe Stock / Anikonaann)
Dark on the left, light on the right: A color gradient from dark to light ensures the maximum feeling of happiness when opening a drawer. (Photo: Adobe Stock / Anikonaann)

Tips for correct storage using the KonMari method

Marie Kondo generally recommends vertical storage: this not only creates a clear and aesthetic picture of all belongings at a glance, but is also efficient and space-saving. Establish a logical order. Everything you need to cook should be near the stove. Determine a specific work surface for preparing the food. Heavy objects belong in the lower cabinets, light objects upstairs.

  • plastic bags Marie Kondo stores upright in a box: all bags are always within reach.
  • cutlery does not come in a drawer with Marie Kondo, but upright in an upright vessel or in a box. Drawer inserts still make sense to organize utensils. Marie Kondo prefers wooden partitions for this – that is high quality and aesthetic at the same time.
  • Tupperware jars are stacked inside each other for maximum space efficiency and the lids are kept separately close by. The same applies to Pots and bowls.
  • Also Sponge and detergent Marie Kondo doesn’t keep it by the sink, but rather collectively in a box under the sink. So the pool remains free of water and limescale stains.
  • Detached Garbage can according to Marie Kondo disturb the image of a tidy and well-organized kitchen. So, if possible: go under the sink.
  • Small appliances such as toasters, coffee machines or food processors should be placed in a central location in the kitchen: either inside a cabinet or on a shelf. Our tip: some manufacturers offer pull-out pocket cabinets for this purpose.
  • Supplies like Pasta and rice after buying you should transfer it to your own, transparent container for a better overview: this way you avoid double purchases and have the food quickly to hand.
  • According to Marie Kondo, there isn’t one particularly important when tidying up the kitchen simple order an: you just have to always know where to find something.
Marie Kondo recommends structuring drawers with boxes and partitions - preferably made of wood.  (Photo: Poggenpohl)
Marie Kondo recommends structuring drawers with boxes and partitions – preferably made of wood. (Photo: Poggenpohl)

Learn to appreciate what you have

The following approach of the KonMari method is exciting, but takes a bit of getting used to: You have to say thank you beforehand for all the things you sort out. Say thank you to an old can opener that helped you get a quick meal on your study days and thank you for the tableware set that was part of your life in your first apartment – and sort it out. But thank you not only for the unpopular parts.

“When you get home from work, tell the clothes you’re taking off and hanging up again, ‘Thank you very much for warming me up again today.’ […] And when you put the bag back in the closet: ‘With your help I was able to do a very good job again today. Thank you very much!'”

Marie Kondo in “Magic Cleaning”

What sounds funny at first is nothing more than an appeal to mindfulness: Those who value their possessions treat them with care and benefit from them for longer. This awareness should also prevent us from constantly buying new things that we don’t need.

Download: Checklist for the clean-up day

Last but not least, print out our checklist to tick off and have it ready on cleanup day. Sneak Peak: You’ll end the big day with a tidy mind.

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